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My understanding of Rwanda was primarily formed through a foggy mini-bus window, as my study-tour snaked its way through the country. We were laden down with heavy books and lectures about the 1994 genocide and the current political situation, but these shed little light on the reality of everyday Rwandan life. The windows of the minibus gave me a glimpse into this reality, and while it did not capture the overcrowding, the agrarian subsistence or the scars of the past, it did shed light on the actual geography of the nation and the role the scenery had to play in the nation’s history. This can be seen particularly through Rwanda’s thousand hills which are dotted with the homes of both Tutsis and Hutus, who live and work side by side every day put aside these grievances for the good of the country. The poverty is bleak, but the perfect climate and rolling hills shone through the bus windows and left a lasting impression.

Land of a Thousand Hills.

Land of a Thousand Hills.

Blue-shirted boys at home.

Blue-shirted boys at home.

Young family on roadside.

Young family on roadside.

Clay-brick home under construction.

Clay-brick home under construction.

View from Kigali hostel (and only exception to 'bus view' rule).

View from Kigali hostel (and only exception to ‘bus view’ rule).

Homes on the Jills

Homes on the Hills

US Dept truck, Kigali.

Red Rural Salons.

Anonymous Rwandan girl.

Anonymous Rwandan girl.

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58 thoughts on “Through the Bus Window : A Photo Essay

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